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‘I can’t explain it. We just do it’

Meet Sgt. Randy Servia, of the MSP-Alpena Post

Randy Servia

HIS RELATIONSHIP WITH ALPENA

An Upper Peninsula native who has been a police officer since 1995, Randy Servia had never been to Alpena until he was assigned to the Huron Undercover Narcotics Team in 2005. He loves it here, Servia said, enough that when he was later given downstate appointments, he decided to commute several hours rather than move out of the community.

WHAT’S HIS JOB?

After several years of dangerous work as part of a motorcycle unit in Detroit, having close calls that could easily have been life-threatening, Servia’s position in Alpena is relatively calm. But it’s still a more intense job than most people realize, the officer said.

A supervisor in charge of the day shift, Servia oversees a squad of seven troopers as they pursue investigations, giving guidance and ensuring that all cases are given thorough attention. His many years of experience help him to mentor the younger troopers, Servia said.

WHAT HE DOES FOR FUN

When the job allows him some down time, Servia enjoys woodworking and maintaining his vehicles and yard. He plays golf some, but he said he’s not very good at it.

Family time is difficult to protect, Servia said. The families of those in law enforcement often have to take a back seat to the work of protecting and serving the community. The public owes a debt of gratitude to the spouses and children who keep being supportive despite missed family functions and promises unkept, Servia said.

WHAT’S THE BEST PART OF THE JOB?

Servia calls himself blessed for the career he’s had as he served in seven different locations throughout the state. What he really loves about the job, Servia said, is solving problems and finding closure for victims.

“We get tasked with a lot of things with limited clues, limited evidence, and it’s just fun putting those pieces together using our resources and tools,” Servia said.

WHAT’S THE TOUGHEST PART?

The role of a police officer isn’t easy, Servia said. In the face of frequent misunderstanding and distrust, officers have to make split-second decisions, put their lives in danger, and give not only their time but also their hearts to a physically and mentally difficult job.

“People wonder, why do you do that?” Servia said. “I can’t explain it. We just do it.”