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Carol Lund’s artwork on display at ACC Fine Arts Building

News Photos by Darby Hinkley Carol Lund talks about one of her CGI pieces of artwork on display at the Alpena Community College Fine Arts Building. This piece superimposes the iconic image of men lunching hundreds of feet above Manhattan onto the top of the new construction at MidMichigan Medical Center-Alpena.

ALPENA ­– Thought-provoking, whimsical CGI designs by Carol Lund pepper the walls of the Alpena Community College Fine Arts Building corridor.

Those who pass through can learn some history through photos and descriptions, as well as a peek inside the creative mind of Lund.

“Carol’s been a student of mine for 20 years, at least,” said ACC Art Instructor Joe Donna.

Lund has been doing CGI artwork since she retired from teaching. CGI stands for computer-generated imagery.

“She was literally in the first CGI class that I offered, and liked it really well, and caught on,” Donna said. “She has used it as a vehicle for presenting a lot of her political and social beliefs, as well as a creative outlet for doing some other interesting projects.”

Above is a CGI piece by Carol Lund, on display at the Alpena Community College Fine Arts Building.

A lot of her projects have centered around and incorporated Barbie dolls.

“She’s also done things with a lot of manipulation of photographs and creating kaleidoscope effects and … creating these really, kind of outlandish, abstract pieces, very design-oriented.”

He said she has substitute-taught for him as well.

“He’s a very patient teacher,” Lund said.

Lund talked about one of her favorite pieces, which superimposes the iconic image of men lunching hundreds of feet above Manhattan onto the top of the new construction at MidMichigan Medical Center-Alpena.

Here is a colorful piece by Lund, featuring a variety of unique, recognizable works of architecture seen around Alpena.

“This is, for me, so important,” Lund said of the piece, called “Unknown Photographer 1932 — Lunch atop a skyscraper.”

In the description below the photos, Lund described the piece as symbolizing “a city unafraid to tackle projects in difficult times!”

“It’s, of course, a very famous photograph in New York City, when they were making the Rockefeller Center,” Lund said. “And I am so proud of the MidMichigan project that I thought, ‘Well, we have to represent a city and a corporation that’s not afraid, in hard times, financially and with COVID, to go ahead and do a project like this … It’s so brave.”

She noted that this was her mid-term assignment, which involved the study of other photographers.

Her inspiration came from the Time magazine “100 Photographs: The Most Influential Images of All Time.”

“I then made these different projects with an interpretation of what was presented in the magazine,” Lund said.

She and her husband go to Cambodia annually, and she enjoys taking photos throughout her travels. She said they have an NGO there, which stands for non-governmental organization. Her husband is a Vietnam veteran.

“It makes photography such an interesting hobby for me,” Lund said.

She said they give high school and college educations to students in Cambodia, where they stay three months out of the year.

As she observes the world around her, Lund is constantly thinking about how she can tweak the photos she takes to make them more visually interesting. She tells stories through her pieces.

“I’ve all along enjoyed taking pictures of mechanical things,” she added.

She has thousands of pictures of car parts that were stacked up streetside in Cambodia.

Her next project is taking photos of the outdoor art installations around Alpena, and adding her interpretations to them.

Brian Schorn is currently the CGI instructor at ACC.

“It’s basically an opportunity for students to be introduced to digital media, particularly Photoshop, which is an imaging software program that allows students to be very creative in the used of digital media,” Schorn said. “It allows them to utilize their creativity with a new medium that is very powerful and can be very, very expressive.”

The Fine Arts Building is open from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Thursday.

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