Ex-Detroit Red Wing Jim Rutherford leads Pittsburgh Penguins’ goalie youth movement

From left, Hockey Hall of Fame Curator Philip Pritchard and the Pittsburgh Penguins’ Evgeni Malkin, Kris Letang and Sidney Crosby and General Manager Jim Rutherford pose around the Stanley Cup as the 2017 NHL champions’ ring is donated to the Hockey Hall of Fame by the Penguins in Toronto on Nov. 29. (AP photo)

By WILL GRAVES
AP Sports Writer
PITTSBURGH — Jim Rutherford knows what it’s like to be a young goaltender trying to find his way in the NHL. Rutherford went through it with the Detroit Red Wings in the early 1970s, thrust into action at 21 years old with a franchise in the middle of a bumpy transition.
Yet that’s where the comparisons end between Pittsburgh’s general manager and the two young men who will play a major role in determining whether the Penguins can become the first team in more than 30 years to win three straight Stanley Cup championships.
Matt Murray and Tristan Jarry, both just 23, have everything Rutherford didn’t when he broke into the league more than four decades ago, from a true position coach to copious amounts of technology at their fingertips to the kind of advanced training techniques (both mental and physical) that Rutherford believes has the NHL’s youngest goalie tandem in position to play a vital role in Pittsburgh’s pursuit of history.
The dark ages of the ’70s — when goaltenders were typically left to sort things out on their own — this is not.
“You didn’t really think about it (back then),” Rutherford said. “You let in bad goals or have bad games, you were kind of on your own and you had to work your way through that. Now these guys have a lot more things to help (them).”
Beginning with Mike Buckley, who began working with Murray and Jarry when they were teenage prospects and has meticulously overseen their rise from draft picks to NHL starters. Buckley spent four years as the franchise’s goaltending development coordinator before replacing Mike Bales as goalie coach shortly after Murray backstopped the Penguins to a second straight Cup last spring.
“You win two championships and make a change, it kind of seems a little odd,” Rutherford said. “But Buck has been the guy that’s developed both these guys right from the start, so it just made sense that he would move in.”
Other youngsters are shouldering the burden, too, including 24-year-old Connor Hellebuyck in Winnipeg (16 wins, 2.44 goals-against average), 23-year-old Andrei Vasilevskiy in Tampa Bay (leads league in wins) and 24-year-old John Gibson in Anaheim (an All-Star last season).
But it’s Pittsburgh at the forefront of a goalie youth movement that runs counter to how things usually work in the NHL. While it’s not unusual for a team to invest in a young goaltender, there’s typically a proven backup at the ready just in case things go awry, one of the reasons the average age of an NHL goalie is 29.