Investigators have plenty of questions they need to ask in Weistein case

For years, former movie mogul Harvey Weinstein allegedly harassed women sexually, assaulting many of them. Now, his company has fired him and, on both coasts, officials are looking into whether he can be prosecuted.

You will have to pardon the many women who say Weinstein assaulted them after word of his misdeeds started circulating for holding their applause.

On Monday, New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman announced his office has begun a civil rights investigation into Weinstein. Schneiderman says he wants to know whether any New York employees were harassed or discriminated against at The Weinstein Co., which is headquartered in New York City.

But in New York, California and other locations where Weinstein is alleged to have assaulted women and threatened some, another investigation ought to be mounted. Its target should be law enforcement and entertainment industry officials who knew about Weinstein’s sleaziness years ago, but did little or nothing to stop him.

Some of his victims have said they were afraid to file charges against Weinstein, or even to complain about him. Investigators should learn just why the women had that fear.