Trump’s tantrums don’t sound like he’s ready to be a leader

In perhaps a demonstration of how ill-prepared Donald Trump would be to handle the realities and inner workings of politics on a national (let alone international) stage, he threw a tantrum over the weekend in which he called for Ohio Gov. John Kasich to drop out of the race to become the Republican nominee for president.

Sounding much like a grade-schooler complaining to the teacher, Trump said it is not fair that Kasich continues to be “allowed” to run his campaign. Trump allegedly cried to the Republican National Committee:

“I said, ‘Why is a guy allowed to run?’ All he’s doing is just, he goes from place to place and loses.'”

Well, that is not entirely true, and Trump knows it, or he would not be so afraid. In fact, he answered his own question about why Kasich continues to run, in another petulant remark. You can almost hear Trump crossing his arms and stomping his feet: “He doesn’t have to run and take my votes,” he said.

Kasich continues to acquire delegates and support. That may not be enough to place him in anything but a spoiler’s role before the convention, but it is plenty of reason for him to stick to his vow to remain on the campaign trail until that time.

Remaining in the race means Kasich keeps Trump looking over his shoulder. If Kasich continues to acquire delegates, it will cast doubt at the convention, and speak to the question that should be on the minds of attendees -which GOP candidate can beat Hillary Clinton? And, which candidate is most likely to drive registered Republicans to vote for Clinton … or not vote at all?

Instead of whining about what is “fair,” Trump would be better served to consider the very real political reasons for Kasich to stay in the race. He can consider it a warm up for the role he hopes to take in January.